Making time to homestead

As I’ve said before homesteading, to me, is a state of mind. Homesteading is making a home the way you want to. It means different things to different people and that is OK. However, when contemplating whether or not to homestead, or how much to dive into, I forgot to mention the most important thing that you must have… time.

The collage above, is just a small snippet of our homesteading adventure: gardening, cooking, preserving, raising chickens, tending to bees, knitting, herbology, etc. In order to homestead, you have to have the time to put into it. I’ll rephrase that, you have to MAKE the time. That means that some other things go by the way side. Unfortunately, when I launched this site back in March, I didn’t take that into account and instead of spending time here I haven’t been making the time.  When you become a homesteader, you have to make peace with the fact that you will be a life long learner. I learn something new every day on this journey. The most recent thing that I’ve learned is that I have to make time and learn to slow down a bit.

  1. Living things have their own time table. You must be patient but also ready at a moment’s notice. Whether it is chickens, bees, the garden, or my roses they all have their own time. You can’t rush things, but at the same time, you must be ready when they need you. Case in point is our bees. We are often asked when we are going to have honey for sale. I tell people, “Hopefully soon, but the bees will let us know”.  The answer is, I have no answer, I can only guess and that has to be ok with me.
  2. There is a season for everything and you have to be ready. People who don’t garden, don’t understand that you can’t grow everything all the time. You have to be prepared to eat seasonally ( like eating tons of asparagus in May, but no corn until late June) and be ready to preserve seasonally as well. Right now, my green beans, squash, broccoli, carrots, cabbage, potatoes, cauliflower and onions are exploding in the garden. Time to get them together and preserve them now. Before I know it I’ll be knee deep in corn, peppers, tomatoes, and garlic.
  3. What deserves your time? This is a trap that I fall into at times. I feel like EVERYTHING is important and must be attended to. That is not the case. You must have priorities and set them accordingly. Last week I spent 2 days canning potatoes, green beans and carrots. It was fun and I’m proud of what I did, but during those 2 days, we had leftovers one night and then ate out another because I was just too tired and my kitchen was too busy with canning. You know what, it’s ok.
  4. Procrastination is the root of all evil…or at least weeds. When gardening and homesteading you cannot procrastinate because living things depend on you. It is much easier for me to go down the Netfl!x rabbit hole, than to get out and weed the tomato plants, but if I don’t get the weeds out, they will impede the growth of the plants ( having flashbacks of the morning glory infestation of 2015 *shudder*). If you don’t put the chickens up at night, a predator will get them, if you don’t get the bees their sugar water, they won’t make the honey you want. Quite literally you reap what you sow.

But I have also been selfish. I started this site in order to help others on their homesteading journey and in that I have failed. So buckle up, it’s about to get fun around here. The garden is hoping, the canner is going, and the recipes are starting to flow. I promise to share it ALL with you and to learn more from you all as well!

What is modern homesteading?

Welcome to the official launch of Hough Family Homestead! I’m so glad that you are here! Look around and become familiar with the site.  In the coming days and weeks you will find everything you need in order to start or to continue homesteading.

So what is ‘homesteading’? Is there is a difference between the homesteading of the 1800’s, the 1900’s and now. There is no question. So what we do now I call ‘modern homesteading’. To me, modern homesteading is making a home. It is also taking small steps towards being more independent of “the system” in whatever ways (large or small) you can.

What does ‘homesteading’ look like at my house?

We garden, preserve our harvest, beekeep, and I knit. But that’s not what it looks like for everyone. Some people container garden, have raised beds, or just completely have brown thumbs. Other homesteaders have animals such as goats, chickens, ducks, etc. Still others choose to only buy locally, make their own household supplies, or a combination of any of these. There is no “right” way to homestead. It’s how YOU want to make your home.

There are a few things that all homesteaders do have in common…..

  1. A homesteader is a person of action. They don’t know just say their going to do something, or think about it, they actually do it.
  2. A homesteader is a life long learner.  Homesteaders are always wanting to learn more, or learn something new.
  3. A homesteader is a servant. Homesteaders are stewards to the land, to animals, and are willing to help others (in their own family, friends, and community).
  4. A homesteader is a part of a community. Being a part of a community is a way to learn and to grow as a homesteader. Homesteaders tend to flock to one another because they feel that they can learn from one another.

As I’ve said many times to anyone who will listen, homesteading is a frame of mind, a philosophy, and a lifestyle. It’s not having a large garden, living off grid in the woods, or making your own clothes (but you sure can if you want to), homesteading can be done anywhere by anyone. If this sounds like you, stick around and visit a spell. We’ve got a lot of things to learn from one another.