3 Things you should think about before starting to homestead.

Because it is a Monday, I’m in a sucky mood. I know, I know, “suck” is a bad word that a lot of people don’t like, but that’s how I honestly feel about Mondays. It has nothing to do with my job, I love it. It’s just because I have a psychotic love affair with my weekends and by Monday I’m just feeling resentful that Saturday and Sunday have left me.

Speaking of suckage (if that’s not a word it should be), I was recently listening to one of my favorite podcasts, and they were talking about “embracing the suck”. The were talking about prepping, but I honestly feel that it could also apply to decisions regarding homesteading tasks.

Homesteading is super cool! I’m not going to lie. Raising bees, or chickens, or goats, harvesting beautiful bounty out of your garden, making your own clothes through knitting and crochet, making your own soap, going off grid, it’s all AHHHmazing! You should do it, you totally should! But before you jump in headfirst there are a few things that you should think about.

  1. Will I MAKE the time? No matter which aspect of homesteading you decide to take on, remember that it takes TIME. Do you have the time to devote to it? This is especially a question that you should ask yourself if you are going to grow veggies or herbs, or if you are thinking about raising animals.
  2. Do I really want to do this? The answer to this question is almost always a resounding YES, however, the question you should ask yourself is, “Will I want to do this a month from now? A year?” Homesteading is a commitment that shouldn’t be taken lightly.
  3. Am I ready to embrace the suck? This is the biggest question that you should think about. With all the cool and amazing things that come along with homesteading, are you ready to do the less cool things? Are you willing to weed your garden on a regular basis? Are you willing to tend to chickens (including wiping their butts? Yes this is something you will have to do), Are you willing to clean your hive frames after the season? Are you willing to get your hands dirty and add compost to your garden?

The fruit of your labors are going to be worth it, but are you willing to put in the work? If you answered yes to these questions then get busy and start today! If you aren’t ready to embrace the suck and make time just yet, then you can still homestead in small ways:

  • buy local produce
  • create home cooked meals with real food
  • garden in small containers
  • learn to knit, crochet, or sew
  • reduce your footprint (conserving energy, water, etc)

You don’t have to go all out to  be a homesteader, like I’ve said before it is a mind set.

Want to talk about it? Have questions? Come visit our Hough Family Homestead Facebook Page and join the conversation today!

What is modern homesteading?

Welcome to the official launch of Hough Family Homestead! I’m so glad that you are here! Look around and become familiar with the site.  In the coming days and weeks you will find everything you need in order to start or to continue homesteading.

So what is ‘homesteading’? Is there is a difference between the homesteading of the 1800’s, the 1900’s and now. There is no question. So what we do now I call ‘modern homesteading’. To me, modern homesteading is making a home. It is also taking small steps towards being more independent of “the system” in whatever ways (large or small) you can.

What does ‘homesteading’ look like at my house?

We garden, preserve our harvest, beekeep, and I knit. But that’s not what it looks like for everyone. Some people container garden, have raised beds, or just completely have brown thumbs. Other homesteaders have animals such as goats, chickens, ducks, etc. Still others choose to only buy locally, make their own household supplies, or a combination of any of these. There is no “right” way to homestead. It’s how YOU want to make your home.

There are a few things that all homesteaders do have in common…..

  1. A homesteader is a person of action. They don’t know just say their going to do something, or think about it, they actually do it.
  2. A homesteader is a life long learner.  Homesteaders are always wanting to learn more, or learn something new.
  3. A homesteader is a servant. Homesteaders are stewards to the land, to animals, and are willing to help others (in their own family, friends, and community).
  4. A homesteader is a part of a community. Being a part of a community is a way to learn and to grow as a homesteader. Homesteaders tend to flock to one another because they feel that they can learn from one another.

As I’ve said many times to anyone who will listen, homesteading is a frame of mind, a philosophy, and a lifestyle. It’s not having a large garden, living off grid in the woods, or making your own clothes (but you sure can if you want to), homesteading can be done anywhere by anyone. If this sounds like you, stick around and visit a spell. We’ve got a lot of things to learn from one another.