A Legacy Not Lost….

Towards the end of the summer I was in a panic! I was almost out of canning jars.  In fact I was headed to my local farm store later in the day to get more when I received a phone call. I was butt deep in the garden so I didn’t answer. I eventually called my friend back and he asked if I was interested in some jars.  A distant relative was moving out of her house and moving in with her daughter and needed to get rid of all her jars.  Of course I was on it in a hot minute.

When I arrived I was in awe. The garage was full of shelving that contained years of canned goods. There was pretty much anything and everything there. I told the people who I was and who had sent me. They apologized for the jars being full and told me I’d have to empty them myself.

They started piling the jars in boxes and started loading my SUV until it was completely full and couldn’t hold anymore.

 

The woman’s daughter asked me what I needed all the jars for. I informed her that I would be using them to can things from my own harvests, as her mother had done. She then asked me to come in and talk to her mother. I walked into the house, now empty of just about everything, and saw a small woman with a homemade dress and a neat bun on top of her head. I introduced myself and told her thank you and what my plans were for the jars.

A petite  elderlywoman rose and walked over to me, she put one hand in mine and the other on my face. She told me, “Thank you for taking the jars and using them the right way. I worked very hard to provide for my family the only way I knew how. They have no idea how much love is in each one of those jars”.

A lump rose in my throat. Again I thanked her and told her I promised I would take care of the jars and their contents and I quickly left.

I took the jars to the farm. Unloaded them into a shed and went through them. If they were too old, I put the contents in a bucket and fed them to the hogs. The rest of the jars were put away for safe keeping and eating.

IF there is a lesson from my story, it is that I realized that my lifestyle of homesteading and food preservation is important, but it’s also my way to show others that I care about them. I care to spend the time and give them the very best. I also realized how important it is to carry this tradition on to others and my own children.  The way was paved for me by many women in homemade dresses and buns doing what they could to make sure their family was cared for and it makes it all worth while.

The making of memories….Squash Jam (recipe)

This time of  year is when the garden typically starts to explode. I am feverishly trying to get all of the harvest frozen, canned, or dehydrated. But this is also the time where I tend to make memories. If you’ve been following me for any amount of time you have heard me mention Grandma Polly (my husband’s grandmother). I credit her, and her mother for teaching me just about all I know about homesteading. Grandma is getting older, and doesn’t do as much in the kitchen, as a result I am blessed to be able to do her canning and preserving for her.  Last year for her birthday I gifted her with her favorite Squash Jam. She eats it almost every morning with biscuits or toast. Last week she mentioned that she was almost out and hinted that she would like me to make some more.

Being able to serve and give back to the woman that has given so much to me is one of the greatest things that I feel like I can do, so of course I agreed. This is not something that I personally use or make for our family, as we don’t use much in the way of jellies or jams outside of apple butter. But it’s incredibly easy. One of the neat things about zucchini and summer squash is that it takes on the flavor of just about anything, which is why the secret ingredient to this is Jello! Want to make some easy jam? Here’s the recipe.

6 cups of squash peeled and ends cut off.  Using the food processor, I blend the squash until smooth.

Cook the squash, on medium heat, until completely soft and excess what has been evaporated. Be careful not to scorch.

Add 1 box of pectin, stir in thoroughly, and bring to a hard boil.

Add sugar, bring back to a hard boil. Remove mixture from heat and then add 1 box of Jello.  I used peach Jello for this recipe, but I have used strawberry as well in the past.

Spoon in to hot jars and then wipe the jars clean.

Place in a hot water bath and process half pints for 10 minutes, pints for 15 minutes, and quarts for 20 minutes.

Remove from the hot water bath and wait several hours until jars are sealed and cool.

Squash Jam

Yield: 12 half pints, 6 pints, or 3 quarts

Ingredients

  • 6 cups Squash grated or blended
  • 5 cups sugar
  • 1 box (3 oz.) Jello (I use Peach, but you can use pretty much anything else)
  • 1 box Sure-Jell Pectin

Instructions

  1. 1. Peel zucchini and/or summer squash.
  2. 2. Either grate, or use a food processor and blend until smooth.
  3. 3. Place in a pot and under medium heat, cook until soft.
  4. 4. Add pectin, stir thoroughly, and cook to a hard boil.
  5. 5. Add all sugar at once, stir thoroughly, and cook again to a hard boil.
  6. 6. Remove from heat and stir in Jello mix.
  7. 7. Spoon into hot jars.
  8. 8. Place lids and bands on jars.
  9. 9. Place in a hot water bath. Process jelly jars for 10 minutes, pints for 15 minutes, and quarts for 20 minutes.
  10. 10. Remove from hot water bath and allow to cool and seal completely before storing.
http://houghfamilyhomestead.com/2017/06/14/making-memories-squash-jam-recipe/