Making time to homestead

As I’ve said before homesteading, to me, is a state of mind. Homesteading is making a home the way you want to. It means different things to different people and that is OK. However, when contemplating whether or not to homestead, or how much to dive into, I forgot to mention the most important thing that you must have… time.

The collage above, is just a small snippet of our homesteading adventure: gardening, cooking, preserving, raising chickens, tending to bees, knitting, herbology, etc. In order to homestead, you have to have the time to put into it. I’ll rephrase that, you have to MAKE the time. That means that some other things go by the way side. Unfortunately, when I launched this site back in March, I didn’t take that into account and instead of spending time here I haven’t been making the time.  When you become a homesteader, you have to make peace with the fact that you will be a life long learner. I learn something new every day on this journey. The most recent thing that I’ve learned is that I have to make time and learn to slow down a bit.

  1. Living things have their own time table. You must be patient but also ready at a moment’s notice. Whether it is chickens, bees, the garden, or my roses they all have their own time. You can’t rush things, but at the same time, you must be ready when they need you. Case in point is our bees. We are often asked when we are going to have honey for sale. I tell people, “Hopefully soon, but the bees will let us know”.  The answer is, I have no answer, I can only guess and that has to be ok with me.
  2. There is a season for everything and you have to be ready. People who don’t garden, don’t understand that you can’t grow everything all the time. You have to be prepared to eat seasonally ( like eating tons of asparagus in May, but no corn until late June) and be ready to preserve seasonally as well. Right now, my green beans, squash, broccoli, carrots, cabbage, potatoes, cauliflower and onions are exploding in the garden. Time to get them together and preserve them now. Before I know it I’ll be knee deep in corn, peppers, tomatoes, and garlic.
  3. What deserves your time? This is a trap that I fall into at times. I feel like EVERYTHING is important and must be attended to. That is not the case. You must have priorities and set them accordingly. Last week I spent 2 days canning potatoes, green beans and carrots. It was fun and I’m proud of what I did, but during those 2 days, we had leftovers one night and then ate out another because I was just too tired and my kitchen was too busy with canning. You know what, it’s ok.
  4. Procrastination is the root of all evil…or at least weeds. When gardening and homesteading you cannot procrastinate because living things depend on you. It is much easier for me to go down the Netfl!x rabbit hole, than to get out and weed the tomato plants, but if I don’t get the weeds out, they will impede the growth of the plants ( having flashbacks of the morning glory infestation of 2015 *shudder*). If you don’t put the chickens up at night, a predator will get them, if you don’t get the bees their sugar water, they won’t make the honey you want. Quite literally you reap what you sow.

But I have also been selfish. I started this site in order to help others on their homesteading journey and in that I have failed. So buckle up, it’s about to get fun around here. The garden is hoping, the canner is going, and the recipes are starting to flow. I promise to share it ALL with you and to learn more from you all as well!

The Beginner’s Guide to Homesteading

You have decided that you want to homestead, or you already do…. a little. Now what? Once you start looking at blogs, websites, journals, Pinterest, you fall down the rabbit hole of overwhelm. There is so much to do, to make, to be responsible for! The result, is that you don’t end up doing any of it and simply just wish you did.

Sound familiar? It does to me. I also came up with lots of excuses as to why I couldn’t EVER do THAT! I forgot about doing it, but that nagging little voice in the back of my head kept telling me that I should homestead.

Where do you start?  The key is to pick one or two small things to make a change. Then after 30 days or so pick up something else

Start a container herb garden with no more than 3 herbs. As they grow USE them in the food that you cook.

  

Start a small garden with no more than 4 types of vegetables. As they grow USE them in the food that you cook.

Re-purpose old items. Instead of buying something new all of the time, and constantly throwing things away, re-purpose them. That old mayonnaise container? Wash it out and use to to hold something in your craft closet. Old socks? Use them for dust rags. Old chicken feeders? Turn them into bee feeders.

  Make you own __________________. Laundry detergent. Soap. Jams/Jellies. Clothes. Dishcloths. Bread. You name it. Pick one thing that you can make to benefit your household and do it.

So think about what is easy or smart for you and your family. Do it for 30 days and then add something else if you feel inclined, or just do that one thing and perfect it.

I’m going to help. This week I’m going to be focusing on how to start an herb garden and how to use it. This is honestly how I started my journey and it’s a great baby step. If you’re way past that, then you’ll enjoy some of the recipes I’ll share with fresh herbs. It’s going to be a fun week. Stay tuned.