The making of memories….Squash Jam (recipe)

This time of  year is when the garden typically starts to explode. I am feverishly trying to get all of the harvest frozen, canned, or dehydrated. But this is also the time where I tend to make memories. If you’ve been following me for any amount of time you have heard me mention Grandma Polly (my husband’s grandmother). I credit her, and her mother for teaching me just about all I know about homesteading. Grandma is getting older, and doesn’t do as much in the kitchen, as a result I am blessed to be able to do her canning and preserving for her.  Last year for her birthday I gifted her with her favorite Squash Jam. She eats it almost every morning with biscuits or toast. Last week she mentioned that she was almost out and hinted that she would like me to make some more.

Being able to serve and give back to the woman that has given so much to me is one of the greatest things that I feel like I can do, so of course I agreed. This is not something that I personally use or make for our family, as we don’t use much in the way of jellies or jams outside of apple butter. But it’s incredibly easy. One of the neat things about zucchini and summer squash is that it takes on the flavor of just about anything, which is why the secret ingredient to this is Jello! Want to make some easy jam? Here’s the recipe.

6 cups of squash peeled and ends cut off.  Using the food processor, I blend the squash until smooth.

Cook the squash, on medium heat, until completely soft and excess what has been evaporated. Be careful not to scorch.

Add 1 box of pectin, stir in thoroughly, and bring to a hard boil.

Add sugar, bring back to a hard boil. Remove mixture from heat and then add 1 box of Jello.  I used peach Jello for this recipe, but I have used strawberry as well in the past.

Spoon in to hot jars and then wipe the jars clean.

Place in a hot water bath and process half pints for 10 minutes, pints for 15 minutes, and quarts for 20 minutes.

Remove from the hot water bath and wait several hours until jars are sealed and cool.

Squash Jam

Yield: 12 half pints, 6 pints, or 3 quarts

Ingredients

  • 6 cups Squash grated or blended
  • 5 cups sugar
  • 1 box (3 oz.) Jello (I use Peach, but you can use pretty much anything else)
  • 1 box Sure-Jell Pectin

Instructions

  1. 1. Peel zucchini and/or summer squash.
  2. 2. Either grate, or use a food processor and blend until smooth.
  3. 3. Place in a pot and under medium heat, cook until soft.
  4. 4. Add pectin, stir thoroughly, and cook to a hard boil.
  5. 5. Add all sugar at once, stir thoroughly, and cook again to a hard boil.
  6. 6. Remove from heat and stir in Jello mix.
  7. 7. Spoon into hot jars.
  8. 8. Place lids and bands on jars.
  9. 9. Place in a hot water bath. Process jelly jars for 10 minutes, pints for 15 minutes, and quarts for 20 minutes.
  10. 10. Remove from hot water bath and allow to cool and seal completely before storing.
http://houghfamilyhomestead.com/2017/06/14/making-memories-squash-jam-recipe/

Making time to homestead

As I’ve said before homesteading, to me, is a state of mind. Homesteading is making a home the way you want to. It means different things to different people and that is OK. However, when contemplating whether or not to homestead, or how much to dive into, I forgot to mention the most important thing that you must have… time.

The collage above, is just a small snippet of our homesteading adventure: gardening, cooking, preserving, raising chickens, tending to bees, knitting, herbology, etc. In order to homestead, you have to have the time to put into it. I’ll rephrase that, you have to MAKE the time. That means that some other things go by the way side. Unfortunately, when I launched this site back in March, I didn’t take that into account and instead of spending time here I haven’t been making the time.  When you become a homesteader, you have to make peace with the fact that you will be a life long learner. I learn something new every day on this journey. The most recent thing that I’ve learned is that I have to make time and learn to slow down a bit.

  1. Living things have their own time table. You must be patient but also ready at a moment’s notice. Whether it is chickens, bees, the garden, or my roses they all have their own time. You can’t rush things, but at the same time, you must be ready when they need you. Case in point is our bees. We are often asked when we are going to have honey for sale. I tell people, “Hopefully soon, but the bees will let us know”.  The answer is, I have no answer, I can only guess and that has to be ok with me.
  2. There is a season for everything and you have to be ready. People who don’t garden, don’t understand that you can’t grow everything all the time. You have to be prepared to eat seasonally ( like eating tons of asparagus in May, but no corn until late June) and be ready to preserve seasonally as well. Right now, my green beans, squash, broccoli, carrots, cabbage, potatoes, cauliflower and onions are exploding in the garden. Time to get them together and preserve them now. Before I know it I’ll be knee deep in corn, peppers, tomatoes, and garlic.
  3. What deserves your time? This is a trap that I fall into at times. I feel like EVERYTHING is important and must be attended to. That is not the case. You must have priorities and set them accordingly. Last week I spent 2 days canning potatoes, green beans and carrots. It was fun and I’m proud of what I did, but during those 2 days, we had leftovers one night and then ate out another because I was just too tired and my kitchen was too busy with canning. You know what, it’s ok.
  4. Procrastination is the root of all evil…or at least weeds. When gardening and homesteading you cannot procrastinate because living things depend on you. It is much easier for me to go down the Netfl!x rabbit hole, than to get out and weed the tomato plants, but if I don’t get the weeds out, they will impede the growth of the plants ( having flashbacks of the morning glory infestation of 2015 *shudder*). If you don’t put the chickens up at night, a predator will get them, if you don’t get the bees their sugar water, they won’t make the honey you want. Quite literally you reap what you sow.

But I have also been selfish. I started this site in order to help others on their homesteading journey and in that I have failed. So buckle up, it’s about to get fun around here. The garden is hoping, the canner is going, and the recipes are starting to flow. I promise to share it ALL with you and to learn more from you all as well!